In the original, Star Trek episode “A Taste of Armageddon” Scotty says “The best diplomat I know is a fully activated phaser bank!” And the contemporary Scotty — Simon Pegg — feels the same way. In speaking about the lukewarm financial success of Star Trek Beyond Pegg isn’t diplomatic at all, he’s pissed. Plus, he says he knows why the movie tanked.

On Tuesday, GeekExchang published a brief interview with Pegg about why 2016’s Star Trek Beyond bombed so hard. Pegg reveals that the use of the Beastie Boy’s song “Sabotage” in the film itself was supposed to be a surprise and the fact that it was cut into the first trailer ruined everything. “I was really angry about that because it used ‘Sabotage,’ which was our surprise moment in the end,” Pegg explained. “It was a big surprise and they blew it in the first trailer, which really annoyed me.”

Pegg also said that he felt like Beyond was marketed wrong and that the studio tried to sell it as a “bonehead action movie,” which was not at all the film he and director Doug Jung wrote together. This misrepresentation, combined with a late-to-the-game marketing campaign doomed the film in Pegg’s view. Which is a shame. Of the three films set in the rebooted “Kelvin Universe,” Beyond has the feeling of being most like the original series. In short, it’s a lot more fun than its predecessor — Into Darkness — and infinitely sunnier than Discovery.

As Inverse previously reported, Pegg also doesn’t necessarily think the rumored Quentin Tarantino R-Rated Star Trek movie will be R-Rated, assuming it ever happens. “It’s an interesting proposition, although I don’t know if that means everybody will be blowing each other’s heads off with phasers and calling Klingons mother fuckers but, who knows, that could be fun.”

Pegg also clarified that the script he and Jung wrote as a sequel to Beyond is still in play. The discussions Tarantino is having with J.J. Abrams and Paramount are separate. At one point, a time-travel story involving Captain Kirk’s dad (played by Chris Hemsworth) was rumored to be happening, though everyone involved claims to be in the dark.

At this point, the canon of any new Star Trek TV series like Discovery and the rumored Khan miniseries are separate from the films because CBS controls Trek TV and Paramount controls Trek movies. But, if a rumored merger combined both studios, then the subject of the next Star Trek movie could be open to all kinds of new crossover possibilities.