Say Cheese

Inverse Daily: An astronaut-shot photo makes a very large rocket look very small

Plus: Why Harrison Ford’s comments at the Oscars are so soothing.

Inverse photo illustration

Few people have a point of view like an astronaut. The latest picture-perfect frame to hit the internet is in this daily dispatch, and you’ll want to see it before you do anything else this Tuesday morning.

Also in this edition of Inverse Daily: Harrison Ford roasts the studio execs who gave a now-iconic sci-fi movie (not Star Wars) some terrible notes. Keep scrolling for that.

We also have a car that’s electric and it’s not a Tesla — which has a kind-of-amazing driver-assistance technology.

I’m Nick Lucchesi, editor-in-chief at Inverse. Here are four essential reads that I hope give you pause or stick with you as you go about your day.

This is an adapted version of the Inverse Daily newsletter for April 27, 2021. Subscribe for free and earn rewards for reading every day in your inbox.

If you missed the “pink” supermoon last night, don’t worry — it will still appear full in the night sky tonight.Gareth Fuller - PA Images/PA Images/Getty Images

Supermoon 2021 Supermoons only come about twice per year, and both of 2021's supermoons are happening in spring. Here's why this lunar marvel matters and what it is, writes Bryan Lawver:

A full Moon is already an event worth looking up for, but there’s an even more spectacular lunar phenomenon you should make time to see: the supermoon.

In 2021, we’ll see two supermoons: We saw one last night (April 26) and will see another on May 26. (If you missed the “pink” supermoon last night, don’t worry — it will still appear full in the night sky tonight.) Supermoons are of course visible throughout the night, with a peak shortly before midnight. So what exactly is a supermoon?

Read the full story.

Related links:

What was seen out of the porthole on a capsule like this one was quite a picture-perfect moment. GREGG NEWTON/AFP/Getty Images

SpaceX Crew Dragon: Look at a stunning photo from space ESA astronaut Thomas Pesquet snapped a shot of the Earth from his capsule — and captured something else at the same time, reports Mike Brown:

An astronaut in a SpaceX capsule captured a beautiful photo of the Earth from above — and managed to capture part of the capsule’s rocket at the same time.

Thomas Pesquet, the first European Space Agency astronaut to fly in a Crew Dragon capsule, shared an image Sunday from his adventure. The photo, taken during the 23-hour trip to the International Space Station that started Friday, shows both the Earth and the second stage booster that helped propel the capsule toward the ISS.

Read the full story.

Related links:

The Bolt EUV is by far the best car on the market for driving to work if you have a highway-heavy commute.Chevrolet

2022 Chevrolet Bolt EUV review Traffic is back. Luckily, the Chevrolet Bolt EUV is by far the best car on the market for driving to work if you have a highway-heavy commute. Oh, and it's all-electric and should get somewhere around 250 miles of range, writes Jordan Golson:

The Bolt EUV is by far the best car on the market for driving to work if you have a highway-heavy commute.

Oh, and it's all-electric and should get somewhere around 250 miles of range, all for around $43,000. (The federal tax credit is gone for all GM vehicles, unfortunately.)

Read the full story.

Related links:

On Sunday night at the Oscars, Harrison Ford read from a list of notes, out of context, that may have sounded wild if you’ve never seen Blade Runner. Handout/Getty Images Entertainment/Getty Images

About Harrison Ford and Blade Runner Blade Runner’s biggest production hurdle wasn't just in the editing room. Here's what Harrison Ford's Oscar joke about Blade Runner really means, writes Ryan Britt:

During the 93rd Academy Awards on April 25, 2021, Harrison Ford made a joke about the post-production of the original 1982 Blade Runner while presenting the Oscar for Best Film Editing. The thing is, it basically wasn’t a joke.

Here’s where those Blade Runner editing notes actually came from and what they really mean.

Read the full story.

Related links:

That about does it for today! Let me know what you think of this daily dispatch by emailing newsletter@inverse.com. You can follow me on Twitter at @nicklucchesi, where I share some of my favorite stories from Inverse every day.

Related Tags
Share: