Sarah Wells

Sarah Wells is a Boston-based Innovation reporter at Inverse covering all things technological from emotional robots to the strange world of machine learning and quantum computing. She also writes Inverse's "Check, please" food column which explores some of food science's most pervasive myths and uses chemistry, biology, and physics to debunk them. In addition to her work at Inverse, Sarah is also a freelance journalist and has had her work published in places like Undark, Popular Mechanics, Gizmodo, Motherboard, PBS Space Time, and Smithsonian.com, among others. Sarah earned her M.S. in science journalism from Boston University in 2018 and was awarded SciShortForm's "Top Pick" blog and honorable mention in 2019. She is also a member of the National Association of Science Writers. When not poring through scientific papers or calling up researchers, she enjoys playing tennis and biking with her husband as well as unwinding with baking and podcasts. (Photo credit: Marshall Chen)
chill out
Ancient ice filled with viruses may reveal the future of Earth’s microbiome
Sarah Wells
“If you put them end to end, tiny as they are, they would stretch light-years away from Earth.”
Check, Please!
Science debunks the biggest myth about coffee and growth
Sarah Wells
The answer lies in old ad campaigns and scientific studies.
zoomies
This squirming robotic superstructure is the next Roomba
Sarah Wells
But don’t call it intelligence.
bust a move
Are the Boston Dynamics robots really dancing? The creepy video, explained
Sarah Wells
No, dancing robots aren’t the next TikTok dance stars.
Check, please!
Science debunks a deadly summer food myth
Sarah Wells
Can you swim after eating? An emergency doctor and drowning expert debunks the science and explains what you need to know about safe swimming this summer.
Human juice
Why scientists want to harvest your sweat while you sleep
Sarah Wells
Engineers from UCSD designed a new sweat-based wearable that can collect sweat while you sleep to create enough energy to power a small digital display.
Check, please!
Food scientist debunks a dangerous myth about washing chicken
Sarah Wells
Leave your chicken slime alone.
seeing double
Alien-like vegetables have mathematical “memory” — study
Sarah Wells
There’s more going on in a Romanesco than meets the eye.
Turn left
Super-precise atomic clocks are the future of space travel
Sarah Wells
The data is in for an atomic clock sent to space in 2019 and a JPL scientist explains what the Deep Space Atomic Clock means for the future of GPS and space travel.
say cheese
Robots are learning to smile and it's making humans cringe
Sarah Wells
Researchers from Columbia University have designed a robot that can smile just like a human, but just how well humans will react to this is yet to be seen.
Check, please!
What's in the tuna salad? Fact-checking the Subway fish sandwich scandal
Sarah Wells
Is Subway really serving tuna? It's hard to know for sure says a scientist, but knowing could shed light on the pervasive, dangerous issue of mislabeled fish.
brush work
A computer can predict if you prefer Rothko or Monet. Here’s how.
Sarah Wells
Your art preferences may inform what you buy in the future.
mask up
New CRISPR face mask could help us fight Covid-19 variants
Sarah Wells
Researchers from Harvard and MIT have designed new "living" face masks that use CRISPR engineered enzymes to detect pathogens, including Covid-19, in minutes.
Check, please
Science debunks a wasteful myth about frozen food
Sarah Wells
Let’s talk freezer burn.
order up
What did Italians eat 2,000 years ago? New discoveries reveal a diverse menu
Sarah Wells
We are what we eat, in more ways than one.
took a dna test
3D skull analysis debunks what we know about Anglo-Saxons
Sarah Wells
For historic Britons, ancestry may be more learned than genetic.
Check, please
The scary real science behind Snow White’s poison apple
Sarah Wells
A strange fact is like something out of a fairy tale.
chill out
Scientists at LIGO are one step closer to solving general relativity’s biggest problem
Sarah Wells
Scientists are one step closer to solving general relativity’s biggest problem.
Goooooooooal
The future of sports is algorithms, not athletes
Sarah Wells
From fantasy leagues to biometrics, sports is becoming its own cyborg.
Check, please!
Science debunks a racist myth about Chinese food
Sarah Wells
“The start of the MSG myth was... a tacitly racist game of telephone.”