Sarah Sloat

Sarah Sloat is the senior science editor at Inverse. She manages the Innovation, Science, and Mind and Body verticals. Sarah also writes Sunday Scaries, a mental health newsletter that's the weekend edition of Inverse Daily. Prior to this role, she was the Mind and Body editor and a senior staff writer. When not reading her team's incredible work, she's reporting on the environment, ancient humans, and health. Her favorite stories are the weird ones. You can also find her bylines at The New Republic, Pacific Standard, McSweeney's Internet Tendency, and Bustle. She's worked extensively as a fact-checker and science consultant, most recently on Marvel's "The Unstoppable Wasp." Embarrassingly, she's also performed comedy at Caveat and Upright Citizens Brigade. If you're looking for someone to chat science on your radio show or panel, she's done that too.
Sunday Scaries
How does childhood affect your life? What hyenas can teach humans
Sarah Sloat
A true understanding of their character is a critical step toward understanding human health.
Bye Bezos
Blue Origin ticket price, launch time, crew, and more for Bezos space flight
Sarah Sloat
Here’s what time the Blue Origin launch is happening and everything else to know.
Sunday Scaries
A new understanding of sleep may explain why the mind wanders
Sarah Sloat
A new understanding of sleep may explain why the mind wanders.
Sunday Scaries
4 strategies to combat mental fatigue, supported by science
Sarah Sloat
Here's another reason to have a cup of coffee.
Sunday Scaries
What causes anxiety? 10 scientific facts you need to know
Sarah Sloat
Over 40 million Americans experience anxiety, but only 36.9 percent receive treatment. These ten facts help explain the science of it.
Welcome to the family
Dragon Man: Gargantuan cranium may reveal a new ancient human species
Sarah Sloat
A massive cranium establishes a new human lineage.
Sunday Scaries
Sleep science: The biggest mistake “successful” people make
Sarah Sloat
Plus three slumber strategies to get you where you need to be.
Sunday Scaries
Brain study explains why only some people want to look into the future
Sarah Sloat
“We're living in a world our brains didn't evolve for.”
Sunday scaries
Sleep and depression: Why a one hour change could make a difference
Sarah Sloat
It all comes back to the “sleep midpoint.”
Sunday Scaries
The best way to tell someone "no," according to three therapists
Sarah Sloat
Three therapists give Inverse advice on how to establish boundaries.
Sunday Scaries
5 ways moms influence our brains, attitudes, and resilience
Sarah Sloat
The science of motherhood explained.
Sunday Scaries
The best apologies have these 4 elements, says a psychologist
Sarah Sloat
Just saying "sorry" isn't enough.
Sunday Scaries
5 scientific reasons why being in nature is good for the brain
Sarah Sloat
There is scientific evidence that climate change takes a mental toll as well as a planetary one
Sunday Scaries
Magic mushroom therapy: Is the drug better than antidepressants?
Sarah Sloat
“Psilocybin therapy didn’t just decrease depressive symptoms.”
Sunday Scaries
Bored and can’t sleep? A new study gives 2 helpful tips
Sarah Sloat
Scientists find an association between boredom and poor sleep quality.
Ancient history
Sex between humans and Neanderthals was way more common than realized
Sarah Sloat
“For a very long time, it has been intensively debated on how these processes exactly occurred."
Sunday Scaries
Gut health and mental health: Microbiome study reveals a landmark finding
Sarah Sloat
New research takes the concept of a "gut feeling" to a whole other level.
Sunday Scaries
Fidgeters, rejoice: Why the vice is actually good for the brain
Sarah Sloat
One unpopular vice is actually helpful for concentration, scientists say.
One year later
Use these 2020 coping mechanisms to survive the coming "echo pandemic"
Sarah Sloat
Just know that “it’s possible that life will never fully return to normal.”
Sunday Scaries
Daylight saving time 2021: Why mood is shifted with the Sun
Sarah Sloat
Scientists examine the effect of daylength on the brain’s opioid system.