Tesla CEO Elon Musk has finally taken a hard stance against President Donald Trump’s ban on Muslim immigration. On Wednesday, 19 days after the ban first went into effect, Musk tweeted that the controversial executive order was “not right.” Then, moments after posting the bold series of tweets, Musk deleted all of them.

“Regarding govt policy, there are often things that happen that many people don’t agree with,” Musk wrote in the first of his now-deleted tweets. “This is normal for a functioning democracy.”

“They rarely warrant a public statement. However, the ban on Muslim immigrants from certain countries rises to this level,” Musk continued in another tweet that no longer exists. “It is not right.”

When a Twitter user asked Musk why he had deleted the tweets, he explained that they “were earlier drafts that [he] accidentally published.”

“I said the same thing a week [ago] already,” he wrote.

For one fleeting moment, Musk took a strong stance.
For one fleeting moment, Musk took a strong stance.

Well, not exactly: When the Muslim ban was first announced back in late January, Musk’s response was tepid. Musk, who sits on Trump’s business advisory council, tweeted that the ban was “not the best way to address the country’s challenges.” So that’s not exactly a fiery condemnation. In early February, Musk again posted to Twitter to say that he disagreed with the ban but would not step down from the advisory council like Uber CEO Travis Kalanick did. This, presumably, was what Musk was referring to when he said that he’d already come out against the ban a week ago. Wouldn’t want to repeat yourself, eh?

In early February, Musk told his 7.2 million followers that he had made “progress” on the matter with Trump.

Musk’s fleeting tweetstorm about the ban came in the midst of a pair of tweets congratulating a Tesla owner who used his swanky car to forcibly stop another driver’s car from running off the road after that driver suffered a stroke.

Photos via Getty Images / Alex Wong

James Grebey is a writer, reporter, and fairly decent cartoonist living in Brooklyn. He's written for SPIN Magazine, BuzzFeed, MAD Magazine, and more. He thinks Double Stuf Oreos are bad and he's ready to die on this hill. James is the weeknights editor at Inverse because content doesn't sleep.