The Abstract Podcast

The strange evolution of the male sex drive

In this episode, we discuss what the latest research says about this surprising new data.

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For decades, scientists suggested that fatherhood fulfilled a primarily evolutionary function: protecting and providing for offspring in return for sex. Meanwhile, sex, with as many partners as possible, helped dads’ genes carry on.

But after millions of years, changing sexual norms, dating apps, and entertainment going increasingly digital, that relationship with sex evolved.

Somewhere along the line, men transitioned from archaic cads, to doting dads, to taking “Netflix and chill” literally.

As scientists scratch their heads about why some men are having less sex than ever, new data offers surprising insight.

In this episode of The Abstract, we discuss the strange evolution of the American male sex drive.

Our first story is about sex in America (and how 1 in 3 young men aren’t have it). Scientists caught a glimpse of Americans' sex lives and discovered a steady sexual decline of the young American male — regardless of sexual orientation. The decades-long data hints why sex is losing its appeal in modern life.

Our second story digs further back into history with a look at how ancient men evolved from carnal carousers to family providers. As scientists get a better idea of the conditions that honed human fatherhood, a closer look at evolution helps explain how the “dads” ultimately beat out the “cads.”

Read the original Inverse stories:

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Right now, facts and science matter more than ever. That's part of the reason for The Abstract, this all-new podcast from the Inverse staff that focuses exclusively on science and innovation. Three new episodes are released a week, and each covers one theme via two related stories. Each features audio of original Inverse reporting, where the facts and context take center stage. It's hosted by the Tanya Bustos of WSJ Podcasts. Because we're Inverse, it's all true but slightly off-kilter. It's made for people who want to know the whole story. Nick Lucchesi, executive editor, Inverse

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