Innovation

SpaceX Starlink is about to set a new record with its Falcon 9 launches

The internet connectivity constellation, designed for high speed and low latency, is taking shape.

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Starlink, SpaceX's emerging internet connectivity constellation, is about to set an impressive new record.

On June 23, the firm is scheduled to launch the 10th batch of around 60 Starlink satellites, adding to its growing constellation that's designed to provide high speed, low latency internet access. This will be the first time SpaceX has sent up three Starlink batches in one month, demonstrating the increase in speed as the firm races to build out its constellation.

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The feat speaks to one of SpaceX's broader missions, to make spaceflight more accessible. The Falcon 9 rocket has made advancements in reusability, landing the booster after launches. This helps save on rocket costs, while also reducing the need to build more rockets. The first two Falcon 9s that supported Starlink missions this month previously flew on launches.

SpaceX's 10th batch is currently scheduled to lift off at 5:58 p.m. Eastern time on June 23. The mission will be held at Launch Complex 39A, at the Kennedy Space Center in Florida.

Alongside the 60 Starlink satellites, the mission will also send up two BlackSky earth observation satellites. This will be the second ridesharing mission from SpaceX, as part of its new program where firms can request to send up satellites as part of other missions. The first user of this Uber-like service was San Francisco-based Planet, which sent up three craft alongside 58 Starlink craft on June 13.

The next mission also helps SpaceX move toward breaking another record. Teslarati notes that the firm plans to launch a GPS satellite for the United States military on June 30, which would make it the first time SpaceX has completed four orbital-class launches in a single month. The firm is also aiming to launch the ANASIS II satellite for the South Korean military in early July, which could mean that it would complete a staggering five launches in five weeks.

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Musk has spoken before about his goals of reducing the barriers associated with spaceflight and making launches more frequent. In March 2017, Musk stated the firm's next goal was to land a rocket and refly it in just 24 hours. The current record for the fastest turnaround, as shown on SpaceXStats, is just over 62 days.

Starlink could be an ideal way for SpaceX to show its talents. The firm first started launching batches of satellites back in May 2019, to fill the skies with thousands of satellites orbiting at a low altitude of 550 kilometers. The firm is expected to hold a beta test, before rolling out service for the northern United States and Canada later this year.

The team's speed of Starlink launches has been gradually increasing. There were six months between the first launch and the second one that eventually came in November 2019. SpaceX launched two missions in January, then launched one every month until May when it took a break.

The Inverse analysis – Speed is key with Starlink, as it's aiming to fill out the sky as fast as possible to get its service online. While the Falcon 9 has served the firm well since its first launch in 2010, the company's next-generation rocket could take things to another level.

The Starship, designed to send humans to Mars, could also play a big role in missions like these. A mockup produced this month shows the ship sending up 240 satellites at a time. Musk has also declared his goal to launch the same Starship three times in one day.

Speedy Falcon 9 launches are cool, but what comes next could be even cooler.

Starlink, SpaceX's emerging internet connectivity constellation, is about to set an impressive new record.

On June 23, the firm is scheduled to launch the 10th batch of around 60 Starlink satellites, adding to its growing constellation that's designed to provide high speed, low latency internet access. This will be the first time SpaceX has sent up three Starlink batches in one month, demonstrating the increase in speed as the firm races to build out its constellation.

‌‌

The feat speaks to one of SpaceX's broader missions, to make spaceflight more accessible. The Falcon 9 rocket has made advancements in reusability, landing the booster after launches. This helps save on rocket costs, while also reducing the need to build more rockets. The first two Falcon 9s that supported Starlink missions this month previously flew on launches.

SpaceX's 10th batch is currently scheduled to lift off at 5:58 p.m. Eastern time on June 23. The mission will be held at Launch Complex 39A, at the Kennedy Space Center in Florida.

Alongside the 60 Starlink satellites, the mission will also send up two BlackSky earth observation satellites. This will be the second ridesharing mission from SpaceX, as part of its new program where firms can request to send up satellites as part of other missions. The first user of this Uber-like service was San Francisco-based Planet, which sent up three craft alongside 58 Starlink craft on June 13.

The next mission also helps SpaceX move toward breaking another record. Teslarati notes that the firm plans to launch a GPS satellite for the United States military on June 30, which would make it the first time SpaceX has completed four orbital-class launches in a single month. The firm is also aiming to launch the ANASIS II satellite for the South Korean military in early July, which could mean that it would complete a staggering five launches in five weeks.

‌more_vert‌

Musk has spoken before about his goals of reducing the barriers associated with spaceflight and making launches more frequent. In March 2017, Musk stated the firm's next goal was to land a rocket and refly it in just 24 hours. The current record for the fastest turnaround, as shown on SpaceXStats, is just over 62 days.

Starlink could be an ideal way for SpaceX to show its talents. The firm first started launching batches of satellites back in May 2019, to fill the skies with thousands of satellites orbiting at a low altitude of 550 kilometers. The firm is expected to hold a beta test, before rolling out service for the northern United States and Canada later this year.

The team's speed of Starlink launches has been gradually increasing. There were six months between the first launch and the second one that eventually came in November 2019. SpaceX launched two missions in January, then launched one every month until May when it took a break.

The Inverse analysis – Speed is key with Starlink, as it's aiming to fill out the sky as fast as possible to get its service online. While the Falcon 9 has served the firm well since its first launch in 2010, the company's next-generation rocket could take things to another level.

The Starship, designed to send humans to Mars, could also play a big role in missions like these. A mockup produced this month shows the ship sending up 240 satellites at a time. Musk has also declared his goal to launch the same Starship three times in one day.

Speedy Falcon 9 launches are cool, but what comes next could be even cooler.

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