The Benefits of Owning a Pet Could Vastly Improve Your Life in 4 Key Areas 

Can pets create health in humans? 

dog
By Janette Young
on

Pet owners will often swear their beloved pooch does wonders for their well-being, and now we have empirical proof. A 2017 study found dog ownership is linked to improved heart health for humans. This is an important finding, given heart disease is the leading cause of death globally.

While the study focuses on dogs and heart disease, it raises the broader question of how pet ownership affects human longevity. Can pets create health in humans?

A study known as the “blue zone” study has focused on factors affecting longevity for over a decade. Nine factors have been identified as increasing lifespan in the communities studied, and many of these factors are increased by pets.

See also: Hair From Dogs and Humans Show Biological Signs of a “Unique Interspecies Bond”

dog walking
Pets provide a reason to get up and moving.

1. Natural Everyday Movement

Much of the focus on pets providing health has been on dog walking. But anyone who owns a pet knows there are numerous incidental physical activities associated with pet ownership — like getting up to feed their pet; ensuring the pet’s food and water is available; and looking after pet “accommodation.”

Reducing prolonged sitting and increasing incidental domestic activity have both been shown to be protective with regard to health risks.

Pets provide nudges to everyday movement.

2. Having a Sense of Purpose

At the very simplest level, pets can provide “a reason to get up in the morning.”

This has been shown to be particularly important for groups at risk of, or experiencing, poorer health — including the aged, people with long-term mental illness, and chronic diseases (including youth).

Our (as-yet-unpublished) research interviewing older people about the impact of their pets on health has found pets could be protective against suicide. Pets are seen as reliant on their owners functionally (“need me to feed them, or they will die”) and emotionally (“he would pine for me terribly”).

Feeling unneeded and of no use has been identified as a key risk factor in suicide.

sleepy cat
Some report they sleep better with a pet alongside them.

3. Regular Destressing Activities

Interaction with pets can reduce stress. There is evidence petting an animal may reduce heart rates, and co-sleeping with pets may improve some people’s quality of sleep.

pets
Pets can improve mental well-being.

4. Belonging and Commitment

It’s in the area of relationships (three of the nine “blue zone” factors) that pets may have their most powerful role in longevity.

Pets can act as a social catalyst, promoting social connections, conversations, and even leading to the development of networks of practical support (a form of commitment).

The connectivity of pets can even include non-pet owners, as people feel safer in pet-owning neighbourhoods. Hence, pets can enable a sense of communal belonging identified as increasing longevity.

The role pets play in mental health (as compared to physical health) may be where the strongest connection to individual longevity lies. There is an established link between heart disease and mental unwellness.

Improving mental well-being (often through social enhancements) may be key in extending life expectancy, especially for population groups vulnerable to poor social connectedness. These groups often have lower life expectancy.

People with long-term mental illness, autism, and the homeless report their pets as providing nonjudgmental, simpler relationships than those with humans.

Older people report pets reducing loneliness and social isolation. Pets may improve vulnerable people’s interaction with others either directly (improving social skills), or their social catalyst role can override social prejudice.

socializing pets
Pets can provide opportunities to socialize.

Why We Need to Take Pets and Health Seriously

In acknowledging people’s connection to their pets, we save lives. In disasters, people die staying with, returning to, and trying to save pets. Disaster management planning is increasingly responding to and harnessing this reality, preventing deaths.

It’s also being recognized women stay with violent partners for fear of what will happen to pets. Pet-friendly escape options can save lives.

Public policies that support pet owners, especially in vulnerable groups, have health-promoting outcomes.

It’s important to remember animals are not “things” — they are living, breathing others. Simplistic understandings (“one pat of a pet per day”) risk endangering animals (overlooking their needs; abuse), and some humans (phobias, allergies).

But for the millions of people who choose to have pets, often seeing them as family, increasing longevity is not the point. They add richness, creating lives worth living (longer) for.


This article was originally published on The Conversation by Janette Young. Read the original article here.