The Oumuamua debate might seem like a no-brainer for the crew of extraterrestrial experts that makes up Ancient Aliens. Think again.

When the cigar-shaped asteroid was first spotted passing through our solar system at above average speeds it quickly sparked speculation that Oumuamua might actually be some kind of alien probe. Then a Harvard professor published a paper giving those extraterrestrial theories a boost. Then Neil Degrasse Tyson weighed in.

So what do Giorgio A. Tsoukalos, David Childress, and the rest of the Ancient Aliens team have to say on the subject? For a group almost singularly focused on the belief that aliens guided alien civilizations and continue to monitor human activity today, they turned out to be surprisingly split on the subject.

David Childress
David Childress

When the subject came up during a panel at AlienCon Baltimore on Friday packed with over a thousand eager fans, Ancient Aliens consulting producer and frequent host David Childress was quick to chime in with a theory of his own.

“We didn’t learn about it very quickly from the military,” he said, hinting at another layer of government conspiracy.

How was it possible that the world’s best astronomers only spotted the Oumuamua asteroid when it was less than a year away from our solar system? And, perhaps more importantly, what does it mean if they noticed it even earlier, but decided not to tell the public?

“By January it had already gone by the sun and was gone,” Childress continued, “but for sure they have seen that asteroid many months or not years before they announced it.”

Before Childress could pick up any more momentum, another panel member cut him off, noting that because the asteroid approached from behind the sun we weren’t able to see it until later than usual. But wait, doesn’t the Earth orbit the sun? That doesn’t make sense. For a second, the entire five-person panel erupted into chaos before dropping back down to a steady simmer.

Nick Pope
Nick Pope

Nick Pope, a frequent Ancient Aliens contributor who previously investigated UFO sightings for the British government, wondered whether we did enough to make contact with the asteroid while we had the chance.

“If this really was some sort of interstellar craft in a dormant state, pinging it actively might be the thing that wakes it up,” he said.

“It could be a spaceship,” added Travis Taylor. “It’s leaving us now. Let’s go wake it up and piss it off now.”

Michael Bara
Michael Bara

“I’m more skeptical,” Michael Bara chimed in, comparing Oumuamua to the infamous Apollo 20 hoax. “It looks like that video we now know is a hoax. I think that means something. This thing is really odd and weird and out of place.”

Regardless of whether Oumuamua is an asteroid or an alien ship or something else entirely, the fact that it’s dominated so many news cycles proves an important point for the Ancient Aliens crowd. The world is finally ready to believe in aliens in a way we haven’t seen in a very long time.

“A few years ago it would have been ridiculed,” Nick Pope said. “Now the media is talking quite openly about this. We have had a fundamental change in how this subject is being gripped.”

Perhaps the next time some mysterious object passes through our solar system, humanity will be ready to reach out and make contact. Though as Pope notes, that might not be the wisest decision.

Paraphrasing Stephen Hawking, he put it simply: “Contacting them could be like Native Americans contacting the Europeans colonizers.”

Photos via The History Channel, Nick Pope, European Southern Observatory/M. Kornmesser