Red Dead Redemption 2 is set to release next week on October 26, but you may want to start clearing space on you video game console now. According to RDR developer Rockstar Games’ official website, the new open-world cowboy simulator will take up a whopping 99 gigabytes of space on your PS4 hard drive and 107 GB on Xbox One.

If you think that sounds like a lot you’re not wrong. It essentially makes Red Dead Redemption 2 one of the biggest video games of all time, which makes sense when you consider everything we know about this game. It’s set to feature a huge explorable open world with countless characters and unspeakable amounts of pre-written dialogue. And that’s before Rockstar launches its multiplayer Red Dead Online experience.

Comparing Red Dead Redemption 2’s file size to other open-world titles only confirms that this game is huge. By comparison, Destiny 2, a huge online-only multiplayer game, comes in at 68 GB. Grand Theft Auto V (also from Rockstar) takes up 66 GB of space, and PS4 exclusive Spider-Man only needed 46 GB to render an accurate, playable map of Manhattan.

Here’s a chart comparing Red Dead Redemption 2’s file size to some of the other biggest open-world games around (and Fortnite):

'Red Dead Redemption 2' is bigger than these 10 huge games.
'Red Dead Redemption 2' is bigger than these 10 huge games.

Considering that people pretty much freaked out when Spider-Man came out and they had to clear up space on their PS4 hard drives, Red Dead Redemption 2 is sure to be a bloodbath for your console’s digital library. Your best best is to probably just invest in an external hard drive.

Rockstar’s ambition to make a massive video game may also have negative consequences beyond your PS4’s hard drive. The company came under some heat recently after co-founder Dan Houser told Vulture that some employees were working 100-hour weeks to finish the game. The company quickly backtracked, with some employees publicly clarifying that they only worked 60-hour weeks (still a lot if we’re being honest).

Of course, “Crunch” (the period before a game’s launch where developers often work excessively long hours to hit deadlines) is a depressingly common occurrence in the industry. If anything, it sounds like Rockstar does a better job of avoiding Crunch than much of its competition, but with a huge game like Red Dead Redemption 2, it makes sense that it would take a ton of work to get the job done.

Maybe that’s why this is Rockstar’s first new game in five years.

Photos via Inverse