The 2018 FIFA World Cup had its first major upset on Sunday after Mexico beat Germany — the 2014 World Cup Champions — in the group stage opener, 1-0. The upset sent shockwaves through the soccer world, but it also shook Mexico City, literally. Seismic monitoring networks picked up an artificial earthquake in Mexico City, most likely caused by fans jumping in celebration.

Most bets were on the current reigning champions to defeat Mexico when Germany kicked off the first match for Group F on Sunday. That was until Mexico’s Hirving “Chucky” Lozano slotted a near-post shot past German goalie Manuel Neuer in the 35th minute, which would eventually become the underdog’s game-winning goal. Needless to say, Lozano’s strike was felt back at home.

“The #sismo detected in Mexico City originated artificially. Possibly by massive jumps during the goal of the selection of #México in the World Cup. At least two sensors inside the city detected it at 11:32,” tweeted SIMMSA, a seismic monitoring network, originally in Spanish.

The account, which is operated by the Institute of Geological and Atmospheric Research in Mexico, shared the frequency data from the moment that Lozano scored the goal, showing how the jumping and cheering of fans may have shaken the bedrock of the city. The data was collected from two different sensors placed in the city, meaning the results of the city-wide celebrations were felt in different parts of Mexico City.

No damage has been reported from the artificial earthquake and Mexico fans are expected to continue celebrating through next week when they face the next round of group stage matches. Mexico will play against South Korea on June 23 at 11 a.m. Eastern.

“To start off on the right foot against the best team in the world, it’s a huge result and great work from the team,” Lozano said in the post-match press conference. His groundbreaking goal suggests Mexico’s national team will continue to shake things up, not just in Mexico City but in the World Cup standings.