The generational term for people who don’t consider themselves to be a part of Generation X but also don’t feel truly like a Millennial either would be “Xennial,” which defines a group of people born between 1977 and 1983, are old enough to remember the days before social networks and the internet of things.

Reactions to the popularization of the term have been varied. Some are glad to have another way to define their identity, while others are casting it as yet another in a long line of relatively meaningless categories designed to group people based on abstract qualities tied to the year of their birth.

Those who’ve reacted positively to the emerge of Xennial are glad that they can put an official title to the out-of-place feeling they’ve had being classed as GenX or Millennial.

For many, a bit of readjustment has been required.

It all makes sense now.

But even as many have taken to this new form of generational identification, others across the internet are lambasting it. And their reasons for doing so are varied. Some, who perhaps feel more attached their old generational moniker, appear to resent the idea that they actually belong to some strange in-between category, while others seem more focused on the fact that the word itself, Xennial, is kind of dumb.

Folks are getting tired of all the new labels.

And some are just ready to re-purpose the word altogether.

Wherever one falls on how exactly this new term fits in and sounds, the emergence of a new generational term is no small deal, as it can allow for further understanding of the way people were shaped by the eras and environments in which they grew up.

Photos via Getty Images / Marco Di Lauro