The arsenal of Battlefield 1 is filled with weapons from the Great War ranging from bolt-action rifles to experimental submachine guns. Regardless of the class you end up playing as the most in multiplayer, all the preset weapons are good at performing their specific roles on the battlefield. But when it comes down to brass tacks, there’s a few that outshine their counterparts in Battlefield 1. Here’s a collection of the best weapons in multiplayer.

MP 18

Known as the first practical submachine gun used in combat, the MP 18 was first introduced into service in 1918 by the Germany Army during World War I. In Battlefield 1, the MP 18 is also the first weapon you’ll have access to as the Assault class, and, with a little bit of practice, it can become a force to be reckoned with in multiplayer. It may not have much accuracy at a distance, which is easily remedied by grabbing the MP 18 Experimental configuration. It may be the first weapon you get, but boy can it do some work with the right soldier holding it.

Mondragón

This rifle, also known as the M1908, was the first self-loading rifle to be adopted by the military on a large scale. Designed by Mexican artillery officer general Manuel Mondragón, many of these rifles were purchased by the German Empire and were used by their aircraft crews.

In Battlefield 1, the Mondragón is an absolute workhorse for the Medic class once you unlock it. It comes with three preset configurations, which unlock at Medic level 1 and 3 respectively, but the Mondragón Sniper is by far the best. Provided you keep the rifle full in combat, it will almost always drop an enemy before they even see you.

BAR

The BAR, also known as the M1918 Browning Automatic Rifle, was designed to be carried by infantry during a frontal assault or to advance on enemy positions while providing supporting fire from the hip. It didn’t see wide action in World War I, but is present in Battlefield 1 as a light machine gun for the Support class. The BAR features a smaller magazine compared to the other light machine guns in the game, but more than makes up for that shortcoming with impeccable accuracy and a great hip-fire rating. While you can get a version of the BAR with a scope, I’d recommend the Storm or Trench presets for the weapon because of the amount of accurate fire they can put downrange. This weapon is meant for mobility, and in Battlefield 1 you’ll be moving from objective to objective — so make sure to grab it as fast as you can.

Martini-Henry

This little beauty is a relic used by the British Army. Originally entering service in 1871, the single-shot lever actuated rifle was used up until the end of World War I by the British due to its reliability and stopping power. Thankfully those same qualities are present in the Battlefield 1 version of the weapon, which you can unlock by reaching rank 10 with the Scout class. The Martini-Henry is a difficult gun to master though, because you’ll have to reload after every single shot — plus it requires a significant lead on your target. Each shot can drop an enemy soldier immediately, which makes it a weapon you’ll want on your side.

Model 10-A

This shotgun was designed by Remington and used by U.S. troops in World War I alongside the Winchester Model 1897 during trench warfare. Due to the reliability of the weapon, the United States also used shorter-barreled versions for guarding prisoners and training aerial gunners.

In Battlefield 1, the Model 10-A serves as the best shotgun for the Assault class once unlocked at level 1 and 3 because of its capability to deal damage up close and at a decent range. On close-quarters maps like Amiens, the Model 10-A can be used to control entire buildings if properly wielded by a good player, but like the other shotguns in the game, it can be a little inconsistent at times.

Photos via Nicholas Bashore

Nicholas is a writer and content creator in Knoxville. He frequently covers video games and other consumer electronics. When he's not writing for Inverse, you can usually find him tweeting about Star Wars or streaming on Twitch.