One of the key components to keeping yourself alive and functioning in No Man’s Sky is to ensure that your exosuit is working properly. Fortunately, that’s quite simple.

In addition to hostile life, environmental hazards are a big concern when you’re on foot. Every planet has one or two of a variety of built-in environmental snafus like extreme temperatures or poisonous atmospheres. These various elements will attack your suit with glee, making your Life Support systems plummet.

It’s a good thing that your exosuit is equipped to handle any and all of this with ease. You simply need to make sure you have enough basic resources on hand to replenish the levels of your respective life-preserving apparatuses.

If you’re being assaulted by the environment, simply opening your inventory and dropping the correct resources in the right spot should fix your problem. If you’re having trouble determining whether or not your Hazard Protection or Life Support need a boost, just check out the white bar at the bottom of each; whichever’s lower will need your attention.

Hazard Protection is refilled with oxides like zinc, titanium, and iron. Life Support, meanwhile, is refilled with isotopes like carbon, plutonium, or thamium9. If you’ve spent any time playing the game, you’ll recognize that those elements are extremely common on pretty much every planet. If, by chance, you happen to find a planet that isn’t covered with one of the elements you require, you can simply take off into space and shoot up some of the asteroids hovering in the negative space around each planet. A little hunting should yield tons of thamium9 and at least a workable amount of iron or zinc.

So long as you listen to the little mechanical voice in your head (or pay attention to the readings flashing across your HUD), you should have zero problem overcoming even the harshest of planetary surfaces.

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Justin spends his days looking at News, writing News and reading News. Also, he probably watches more TV and movies in one month than you've seen your whole life.