In the play Harry Potter and the Cursed Child, which follows Harry and his friends into their late thirties and early forties, Hermione Granger is the Minister for Magic. That means, of course, that Ron Weasley is the magical world’s First Gentleman. As Bill Clinton is gearing up to potentially act as his parallel in the American human world, he should look to Ron Weasley for tips of the trade.

Always keep a sense of levity

Cursed Child went a little overboard with giving Ron the Weasley twins’ personality, to the extent that the writers seemingly forgot his past experiences (for example, sending a love potion as a gag gift and forgetting that time in sixth year he almost died from one). But nevertheless, Ron offers many light moments, like jabs at Draco Malfoy’s new ponytail.

Luckily, Bill Clinton is already on the right track here. In the most bizarre and unreal election season in all of American history, his simple childlike joy at playing with balloons at the Democratic National Convention brought some much-needed levity.

Don’t be afraid to tell it like it is

Just as Hillary is candid about the fact that, in her public service career, the “service” part comes more easily to her than the “public” part, it seems Hermione feels the same way as Minister. At one point in Cursed Child, when she says, “I will not stick my head in the sand….and I don’t care how unpopular it makes me….” Ron responds with, “You were never one for popularity, were you?” (pg 67).

Let her outfits outshine you

Bill is not exactly a style icon, but that’s okay. Here’s a stage direction from one of the alternate realities in Cursed Child: “Ron runs in. His hair is spiked. His clothes scruffy. He is slightly less good at the rebel look than Hermione is” (182).

Does this mean Bill should start spiking his hair? Well, it could be something to occupy him when the balloons run out.

As the magical world’s First Gentleman, Ron is relaxed and mellow, with quick laughs to offer and an occasional dubious sense of style. If Bill looks to Ron as his model, America’s first First Man could be magical indeed. Just as long as there is not too much mischief managed.

Lauren's writing has appeared on The Huffington Post, Page Views at The New York Daily News, and 20SomethingReads at The Book Report Network. She has also interned at The Overlook Press and Cosmopolitan. A Dartmouth grad, she lives in Brooklyn.