Germany’s national soccer team could have a very good summer, UBS revealed on Thursday. The investment bank has run a simulation of 10,000 virtual tournaments to deduce who is most likely to win this summer’s FIFA World Cup in Russia, running from June 14 to July 15. Based on the data, it looks like the last tournament’s winners are set to claim a fifth title — but there’s always the chance of a last-minute upset.

Overall, the research showed that the likelihood of either Germany, Brazil or Spain winning is 60 percent. Michael Bollinger, head of emerging market asset allocation, said that the teams share “a number of factors which tend to be reliable indicators of how well a team will be doing during the tournament.” They are the top three teams according to the Elo rating that measures how well teams have played in the past, giving stronger weight to teams that beat higher-ranked teams. None of them lost a game in the qualifiers, bar Brazil that only lost its first game against Chile in 2015. All three have also won the World Cup before. Bearing these factors in mind, the team devised a simulation, based on the last five tournaments, to produce the winners:

The chances of each team and how far they will get into the World Cup.

The team used what’s called a Monte Carlo simulation to find the odds. That means the statisticians drew a number of random variables out to allow for the fact that sports sometimes produces surprise results. It’s the same statistical method that revealed how black holes can “flip” other black holes, and it’s ideal in places where random variables would likely upset the probability of certain results.

While UBS expects Germany and Brazil to get an easy start, Spain will have to work hard to beat European champions Portugal in the opening match. The research also suggests to not count Belgium, England, France or Argentina out of the running just yet. Argentina will depend on star player performance, but France’s results will depend on who they face in the semi-final. England and Belgium have balanced teams, but will probably have to face Brazil.

The opening game, set for June 14, will be the first big test of UBS’ simulation. At 6 p.m. Moscow time, Russia faces Saudi Arabia in a game that Russia is expected to win with a probability of 78 percent. Of course, that also means there’s a 22 percent likelihood that doesn’t happen.

Soccer is of great interest to investors and statisticians, and sometimes the results are surprising. A report published in November 2017 claimed that nations who have played each other in the World Cup are 56 percent more likely to later engage in conflict.

Elon Musk has a tough schedule. In an explosive interview published Thursday night, the Tesla CEO defended sometimes erratic behavior by revealing details about his 120 work weeks, factory all nighters on his birthday, and a sleep schedule that’s all but impossible to maintain without Ambien.

“It is often a choice of no sleep or Ambien,” Musk told the New York Times. Two people familiar with the board told the publication that some members are concerned about his use of the drug, with some noting that instead of going to sleep Musk stays up and posts on Twitter.

AirPower, Apple’s wireless charging mat, is almost here. That’s according to a Friday report that claims the long-awaited peripheral is due for launch at a September press conference, alongside a cheaper MacBook and three new iPhones.

It’s the latest sign of an imminent launch for Apple’s charger, announced at last September’s iPhone X press conference alongside the company’s first wireless-supporting phones but missing in action ever since. The device, which uses a Lightning charging port to receive power, can charge up to three devices at once as long as they support the Qi standard. The pad will also support an extension to the Qi standard that enables support for smaller devices, like the Apple Watch Series 3. The DigiTimes report claimed that the pad would cost somewhere around $161 to $193, placing it at the high end of charger prices.

A day after Apple retracted the seventh iOS 12 developers beta hours after its release, the company has pushed out iOS beta 8 in an effort to address some of the seventh beta’s blunders.

The previous update was the most bug-riddled one yet. Developers took to Reddit and Twitter to report that apps were unacceptability slow to load or wouldn’t load at all. For the moment, it would seem that this most recent patch has already fixed its predecessor’s shortcomings.

Monday saw the seventh patch for the iOS 12 beta in what has been a rapid fire of updates to the unreleased software. Users who signed up for Apple’s $99 developers program now have the option to upgrade their iPhone or iPad once again, only a week after the release of the previous beta.

The flip phone could make a comeback. New concept renders released on Thursday show how Samsung’s long-rumored “Galaxy F” foldable phone could radically transform the smartphone space, with the first major form factor change since Apple’s iPhone convinced most of the industry to produce flat black slabs back in 2007.

The renders were produced for NieuweMobile by Jonas Daehnert, a freelance industrial designer from Erfurt, Germany, based on patents filed by Samsung relating to a foldable phone. The fold would enable a switch from the 18.5 by 9 ratio screen on the Galaxy S9 Plus to a 21 by 9 screen with 1,440 by 3,360 pixels. If Samsung aims for the same pixel density as the S9 series, that would make the F’s screen around 7.3 inches in size. It would mean a staggering amount of screen real estate for watching films and responding to WhatsApp messages, but Daehnert notes that it’s unlikely to fold flat, so it will probably have a wedge-shaped gap similar to Microsoft’s Surface Book laptop.