Kiona Smith

Kiona Smith is a space reporter at Inverse. Nothing brings them more joy than a gleefully morbid description of a black hole or a deep speculative dive into what aliens might be like, except maybe a great pun.

When Kiona isn't enthusiastically nerding out about space at Inverse, they also contribute freelance archaeology stories at Ars Technica. Over the last decade, Kiona has written online and in print at a number of other outlets. Their first book, an illustrated look at a weirdly niche bit of spaceflight history, will be out with Running Press in 2024.

Kiona studied anthropology at Texas A&M University and has spent the last decade telling people interesting stories about science.

Based in Tulsa, Oklahoma, Kiona shares their office with a scruffy little dog and a very jumpy gecko. When not writing, they're usually knitting, cross-stitching, tabletop gaming, or chasing Pokemon.

Find them on Twitter @KionaSmith07.

Space

The James Webb Space Telescope Just Uncovered A Possible Explanation for Why Giant Gaseous Planets Often Fail

The problem is the neighbors and their pesky ultraviolet radiation.

ByKiona Smith
Space

Look: Intuitive Machines’ Odysseus Moon Lander Sent Back What Could Be Its Final Photo

“He’s a scrappy little dude.”

ByKiona Smith
space

It Turns Out Tiny Galaxies Made the Universe Visible

Dwarf galaxies packed a surprisingly energetic punch in the early universe — and gave us all a helluva view.

ByKiona Smith
Space

Behold The Strange Beauty Of A Tangled Nebula

This is all that's left of a massive star that died 40,000 years ago.

ByKiona Smith
Space

This Hellish Version of Earth Has Lava Oceans

Surf's up — if you dare.

ByKiona Smith
Space

NASA Didn’t Just Redirect An Asteroid — It Reshaped It

Forget a little misdirection; DART rearranged almost a tenth of asteroid Dimorphos's mass.

ByKiona Smith
Space

46 Years Ago, a Rare Alignment of Our Planets Allowed For An Iconic Space Mission

With Voyager 1 on the fritz, it's a great time to look back at the 46-year space mission's origin story.

ByKiona Smith
Space

The Webb Telescope Just Solved a 37-Year-Old Space Explosion Mystery

SN 1987a is the only supernova that's been visible with the unaided eye in the last 400 years, and we're only now figuring out what's at its center.

ByKiona Smith
Space

A Backbone Holding Up the Milky Way Is Bending — And Astronomers Don't Know Why

The nearby Radcliffe Wave is in motion, a new study reveals.

ByKiona Smith
Space

Watch: SpaceX Could Launch Intuitive Machines’ Moon Lander Tonight And Finally Make History

Here's your guide to launch day and why this commercial space mission actually matters.

ByKiona Smith
Space

Rare Meteorites That Could Be Long Lost Chunks of Mercury Just Fell To Earth

The meteorites are an extremely rare type of space rock called aubrites.

ByKiona Smith
Space

Look! NASA Captured A Rare Closeup of the Solar System’s Most Terrifying Moon

Io is the most volcanically active moon in the Solar System.

ByKiona Smith
Space

Saturn's "Death Star" Moon Mimas May Actually Be Packed Full of Water

Still no sign of that exhaust port, though.

ByKiona Smith
Space

What Happens If You Look Directly At a Solar Eclipse? An Ophthalmologist Reveals the Damage

Spoiler alert: Don't.

ByKiona Smith
Space

Hubble Captured A Near-Perfect Spiral Galaxy Just After A Supernova

The calm after the storm.

ByKiona Smith
Space

After Swapping Cameras, Astronomers Spot Stars Being Ripped Apart All Around Us

The universe is far more violent than we realize.

ByKiona Smith
Space

Astronomers Captured A Star Cluster Ripping An Interstellar Dust Cloud To Shreds

You can see the constellation Pleiades with the unaided eye, but the tattered nebula only shows up with a sizeable telescope.

ByKiona Smith
Space

The Wolf Moon Is Rising Tonight — Here’s Where You Can Spot It

"Go look at the sky" is the best New Year's resolution.

ByKiona Smith
Space

A Potential Source of the Milky Way’s Highest-Energy Rays Is Mystifying Physicists

Some high-energy cosmic rays may come from twin jets of matter being ejected from a smallish black hole.

ByKiona Smith
Space

New Study Finally Sheds Light On One of the Universe’s Weirdest Objects

These weird celestial objects can form like stars or planets, but the end result is the same: a gas giant almost big enough to be a star.

ByKiona Smith