The Abstract Podcast

How healthy are you?

In this episode, we discuss what the latest science has to say about how healthy you are.

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Researchers across the world are constantly studying what makes a human body healthy. What they are increasingly learning is that external factors influence your well-being. After all, your health doesn’t just come down to genetics. It doesn’t only come down to biology.

Our health depends on where we live, the care we receive, our personal choices. From deep-rooted socioeconomic factors to the cup of coffee you drink every day, we’re learning — with each new study released by those researchers — that how long we live is a result of the lives we lead.

In this episode of The Abstract, we discuss what the latest science has to say about how healthy you are.

Our first story looks at the relationship between upward mobility, stress, and cardiometabolic health. Scientists have learned that there are unique stressors on people who "buck the odds" and improve their financial status. While climbing the socioeconomic ladder is part of the "American dream," the process can come with eye-opening new costs to our physical wellness.

Our second story follows the health outcomes of something that over 83 percent of American adults partake in regardless of their economic status: drinking coffee. In analyzing brewing methods head to head, researchers got to the bottom of one nagging question: How does drinking coffee actually affect our health? And more importantly, what is the best way to drink it?

Read the original Inverse stories here:

Where to find us:

Right now, facts and science matter more than ever. That's part of the reason for The Abstract, this all-new podcast from the Inverse staff that focuses exclusively on science and innovation. Three new episodes are released a week, and each covers one theme via two related stories. Each features audio of original Inverse reporting, where the facts and context take center stage. It's hosted by the Tanya Bustos of WSJ Podcasts. Because we're Inverse, it's all true but slightly off-kilter. It's made for people who want to know the whole story. Nick Lucchesi, executive editor, Inverse

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