The Abstract Podcast

Antibodies, immunity, and the future of fighting Covid-19

In this episode, we discuss how the immune system fights Covid-19 — and how that process shapes mental health.

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While antibodies have been billed as a passport to pandemic freedom, research shows they don't last forever and instead fade over time. However, the latest plasma study suggests this may not be cause for alarm — but instead, a call to action.

As clinical trials continue to test whether antibodies are key to treating Covid-19, scientists and clinicians also search for the secrets of a strong immune system.

As new research sheds light on how our immune response affects anxiety and behavior, the latest findings emphasize that mental health is health. Our best defense against future illness will involve an integrated approach that keeps both our minds and bodies as strong as possible.

In this episode of The Abstract, we discuss how the immune system fights Covid-19 — and how that process shapes mental health.

Our first story is about the new research tracking the limited lifespan of Covid-19 antibodies. While antibodies may not be eternal, the study highlights the fact that, contrary to what you might think, this may not be a bad thing.

Our second story looks at a newly discovered link between the immune system and mental health. With the pandemic driving symptoms of anxiety and depression, researchers say it’s time to consider Covid-19 a crisis of both physical and mental health — and to treat these crises holistically.

Read the original Inverse stories:

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Right now, facts and science matter more than ever. That's part of the reason for The Abstract, this all-new podcast from the Inverse staff that focuses exclusively on science and innovation. Three new episodes are released a week, and each covers one theme via two related stories. Each features audio of original Inverse reporting, where the facts and context take center stage. It's hosted by the Tanya Bustos of WSJ Podcasts. Because we're Inverse, it's all true but slightly off-kilter. It's made for people who want to know the whole story. Nick Lucchesi, executive editor, Inverse

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