Anker’s widely popular Nebula Capsule set a new standard for portable mini projectors, and raised $1.4 million in its initial crowdfunding campaign. Now, with a new crowdfunding campaign on Kickstarter, Anker is once again redefining mini-projector technology with its new and improved Nebula Capsule II.

Like its predecessor, the Nebula Capsule II(https://f98d2e86.kckb.st) is around the size of a 12-ounce soda can. So unlike bulky, traditional projectors, it’s easy to setup, transport, and store. But the Capsule II also features a whole host of improvements over the original.

For example, despite maintaining roughly the same size as the Capsule I, the newest model features a top-grade Digital Light Processor (DLP) capable of projecting 100-inch videos in 720p HD quality. And thanks to OSRAM LED hardware combined with IntelliBright™ smart software, the Capsule II adjusts localized brightness in real-time, delivering a vivid more radiant image that is twice as bright as the original.

In the sound department, the Capsule II boasts an omni-directional speaker that is 60-percent more powerful than that of the Capsule I. It also features a much deeper bass thanks to a driver enclosure that’s been enlarged by 50-percent.

The Capsule II also features Android TV, which offers thousands of movies, shows, and games from Google Play, YouTube, Netflix, Hulu, and other popular apps. And aside from Android games and its own custom gamepad, the device is compatible with most popular gaming consoles including Switch, PlayStation 4, and Xbox 1.

So if you’re interested in a pint-sized portable projector that casts crystal-clear high-definition videos and amazingly outsized audio, look no further than the Nebula Capsule II. While its Kickstarter campaign has already blown past its modest crowdfunding goals, there are still several Capsule II reward packages available to contributors. But act fast. If the Capsule I’s success is any indication, they won’t be around for long.


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