‘This Week In Podcasts’ is out weekly podcast round-up of internet radio listened to and loved by the Inverse staff.

Shall We Play a Game - [Episode Link]

I was recently introduced to “Shall We Play a Game?” a new series about video games from Kotaku and New York Times writer Chris Suellentrop. It’s sharp and rich with insight, but perhaps best of all is that every episode is shorter than a TV sitcom. There’s no fat here, it’s focused and quite serious for a show that is all about fun and games.

The best episode to jump in is the most recent: Ernest Cline, author of “Armada,” and critic Laura Hudson who disliked it. Suellentrop’s conversation with both individually is an amazing demonstration of opposing views presented without an agenda, and neither leave you thinking less of the other. - Eric Francisco

KCRW’s Here Be Monsters is a chronicle of creepy and true stories, and given that I seek this shit out on the reg, I got pretty into the latest podcast about the Heaven’s Gate cult. It’s… unsettling. It kind of starts innocently — walking through the cult’s beginnings and business, which was web design — and moves into darker territory. The narrator sounds like a “Tower of Terror” bellhop and odd, pulsating electronic music sits beneath the proceedings. There’s a pretty unusual twist in this episode, too. It all adds up to a pretty singular aura. - Corban Goble

I know we’ve mentioned How Did This Get Made on here already, but this week’s Sharknado 3 episode continued in the tradition of completely — and hilariously — deconstructing the improbably popular schlock movies that have come out the past three years. The best thing about this episode is how the hosts complain that they couldn’t be in this installment when it features cameos from z-list celebrities like Jackie Collins or the Real Housewives of Wherever. These are the “so bad they’re good” movies this show was made for. - Sean Hutchinson

Talking To A White Guy is a podcast hosted by Judnick Maynard, who’s written for the Fader, Jezebel, and Gawker. The premise is simple, Judnikki chats with a random white guy without giving his name about whatever topic comes to her mind. The show doesn’t give an introduction or even a proper outro, Judnikki frequently steps over the co-host. It’s great.

This week Judnikki spoke to the issues surrounding Nicki Minaj and Taylor Swift, feels uncomfortable attending protests, and throws disgust towards white people obsessed with black hair. It’s a conversation about race that illuminates the shallowness of “conversations on race.” - David Turner