It is always about communication. The worst possible scenario happened for Mutiny happened in episode, “The 214s,” where the company was completely replaced by another program. This is exactly what was feared might happen when Joe came to the company and offered it discounted server space. This, of course, happens just as Mutiny hosts a large event and Cameron finally realizes that her company isn’t just “games” but is about bringing people together, thus putting the onus back on her and her team to come out of this mess.

Cameron isn’t the only one with the weight of the world on her shoulders. Gordon is starting to increasingly see the cracks of his world in visions of a past affair and in dealing with the two workers of his garage company leave and getting arrested for breaking into a friend’s house. A lot, certainly too much, is happening in Gordon Clark’s life. Last season there was plenty of tension between Gordon and Donna, but this season appears like there should be even more, yet it isn’t there. It’s happening in the margins, in conversations between other characters, but the show is not rushing to play this out.

Last season, there was a build up to the debut of the machine that Joe, Gordon and Cameron put together in the final two episodes. The second season right now lacks that drive and endgame. There is always a strange agreement historical dramas make that the audience, if knowledgable, can predict what happens next because of history. The season right now does not feel so connected to historical trends because the journey on screen is more about people than it is about technology.


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