With all the good NASA puts into the universe, it’s only fair they completely fuck up sometimes. At least their latest music video isn’t a truly repugnant kind of fuck up — it’s akin to when your dad comes to pick you up from school blasting Kenny Loggins while wearing a shirt that says “I WENT TO A KENNY LOGGINS CONCERT AND ALL I GOT WAS THIS LOUSY T-SHIRT.” In other words, NASA’s latest music video has good intentions, but holy hell is it cringeworthy.

Late last month, the space agency released a video of footage of Earth taken from the International Space Station, scored by Disturbed’s cover of “The Sound of Silence.” Nobody needed to hear David Draiman’s take on the Simon and Garfunkel song in the first place, and that goes double for it being set to what appears to be a PowerPoint presentation of Earth. But in any case, it exists now, and we’re all just going to have to deal with living in this bleak new reality.

It’s unclear what inspired NASA to drop this video right now, or why they thought it should be released to anyone, ever. Sure, the images from the ISS are nothing short of awe-inspiring, but the quick dissolves and complete lack of context makes the whole video feel like a hastily put-together book report scraped together at lunch. Frankly, it rules.

“Our thanks to Mr. Paul Simon and Disturbed,” the agency wrote in the video’s description, revealing its possible anti-Garfunkel stance.

Even metal blogs are not sure what to say about the whole thing.

“Disturbed released its cover of Simon & Garfunkel’s ‘Sound Of Silence’ in 2015 and the damn song just won’t seem to go away,” Greg Kennelty writes on Metal Injection. “It’s made its most recent appearance in a video made by NASA’s Johnson Space Center which showcases a ton of awesome-looking satellite imagery but is unfortunately backed by the Disturbed cover.”

“Hey, at least there’s a mute button, right?” Kennelty adds.

NASA’s latest offense is cringeworthy, but forgivable. I will be cleansing my eyes and ears of this horror by listening to Kenny Loggins on repeat and suggest you do the same.

Photos via NASA