Around 71 percent of the Earth’s surface is covered in water, but unless you have gills, you probably haven’t explored it all that much. Enter Roman Federstov. A Russian fisherman, he works on a trawler near the northwestern city of Murmansk, and he’s been sharing his deep sea discoveries on Twitter for most of this year. Federstov has revealed a truth that we probably suspected all along: the ocean can be terrifying and thoroughly fascinating, filled with creatures whose appearances you’ll see when you close your eyes at night.

There are flesh-piercing pinchers, and creatures with gaping mouths, and even some adorable starfish. Thankfully the internet can offer a glimpse at the most petrifying of them. Here are 20 of the best:

This one looks slightly human in a few disturbing ways. That is all.

This guy’s amber eyes will give you a fright in the dark.

“Sorry, can I just interrupt…”

Impressive set of gnashers … probably not so nice if you’re on the receiving end.

This hand-sized foe looks manageable, but probably wouldn’t fit in with a home aquarium.

Angry.

This guy looks how I feel after a night out.

As does this one.

Eye of fish or eye of Sauron?

“Well hey there!”

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Would not like to be in between those claws.

Surprised.

This one looks like a ball of ink. It probably isn’t, as that wouldn’t be a very practical design for a fish, but it looks like one.

Rays are probably the best paper-shaped fish in all the Russian seas.

Ask a question by turning your body into the shape of a question mark.

This guy looks ready to start a fight.

Open wide!

This gives you a sense of scale.

This is all kinds of terrifying.

And finally, a nice little soothing one to round things off. Look at those colors! If there were more fish like that in the sea, and less like the other 18, perhaps I would’ve gone into fishing instead of just writing about fish.

Photos via rfedortsov/Twitter

Mike Brown is a London-based writer with a passion for tech, politics, and photography. After studying Journalism at Columbia University in New York, he returned to the UK to cover the news as it happens around Europe. His work has been featured in IBTimes, Neowin, Building Magazine, and more. Email him at mike.brown@inverse.com