Vine, the often hilarious, always weird looping video app, was too good for the Internet. On Thursday, Twitter announced that it would be discontinuing the mobile app, essentially leaving the social media site to, well, wither on the vine.

While this means that there won’t be any new Vines, the company says that everyone’s preexisting Vines are safe — for now, at least.

“Nothing is happening to the apps, website or your Vines today,” the company said in their announcement on Medium. “We value you, your Vines, and are going to do this the right way.”

Vine says it will be keeping the website online so that it will still be possible to view old Vines. The company claims that users will be able to “access and download” their old Vines, though it’s unclear exactly what “access” entails.

Inverse contacted Vine to ask what functionality the website is going to have after the app is discontinued. Will users be able to delete old Vines? Will the social sharing aspects of the service stick around? And will Twitter continue to provide technical support for Vine going into the future.

A rep for Vine responded that the company will “have more specifics on what’s next to share in the coming weeks, but we have nothing to add right now.”

Inverse will update this post when Vine provides more information about their future plans for the service.

Vine, which also said in its initial statement that it would notify users before it makes any changes to the app or website, promised to provide more details in the future via the company’s blog and Twitter account.

Photos via Vine

James Grebey is a writer, reporter, and fairly decent cartoonist living in Brooklyn. He's written for SPIN Magazine, BuzzFeed, MAD Magazine, and more. He thinks Double Stuf Oreos are bad and he's ready to die on this hill. James is the weeknights editor at Inverse because content doesn't sleep.