The terrifyingly green Olympic diving pool was closed by Olympic officials this morning. Nobody’s entirely sure why, but the prevailing theory is that the pool smells like farts.

It’s another classic development for the Rio de Janeiro Games’ diving pool saga. Officials are being relatively tight-lipped (and nosed) about the current situation, but Mario Andrada, the official spokesperson for the Olympics Organizing committee, confirmed that the diving pool was closed in a statement to the German DPA wire service.

Philip Wilkinson, the media manager for the 2016 Rio de Janeiro games told CNN that diving training was canceled Friday morning. He added, “The reason is that the water must be still so the pool can return to its blue color as soon as possible.”

Instead, the divers are training on land Friday morning, which hasn’t relieved any of the anxieties about the safety of swimming in the green water over the last few days. British bronze medalist Tom Daley took to Twitter to vent his anxieties about the safety of the pool water that he’s been jumping into for the entire competition.

German diver Stephan Feck went to the pool this morning to work out and discovered the closure. He also encountered a terrible fart smell that is filling the entire Maria Lenk Aquatics Center. He and a teammate (probably one of his diving partners, Patrick Hausding or Sascha Klein) posted a photo of the two of them covering their noses while standing by the pool.

Feck captioned this on Facebook as: “The moment you want to do some workout and the pool is closed the whole venue smells like somebody has fart #goodmorning #failed #tollermensch.”

It’s still unclear what this will mean for the women’s three meter preliminary event scheduled for 3 p.m. Friday afternoon. And with athletes complaining of irritation because of over-chlorination yesterday, let’s hope that the water (and fart smells) have actually cleared up.

Photos via Stephen Feck, Getty Images / Adam Pretty

Dyani Sabin is a science writer from small-town Ohio transplanted to New York City. Former biology researcher and library supervisor, you can also find her writing at Scienceline.