On Tuesday, November 3, the Northern Lights were visible for the second time in as many months.

Last month, the Northern Lights (also known as Aurora Borealis) appeared in the night sky for northern European viewers to enjoy.

This month, North American stargazers could share in the splendor, as well.

The Northern Lights appear in the Northern Hemisphere most often between late fall and early spring.

Aurora Borealis is caused by “electrons from space colliding with oxygen and nitrogen in Earth’s upper atmosphere,” according to NASA.

By colliding, the electrons “excite” the gases of the atmosphere and transfer their energy to them, as well. What we see as green and pink lights in the sky, is actually just the result of those gases returning to their normal state.

In addition to Aurora Borealis, North America should stay excited (pun intended) for the upcoming South Taurid Meteor Shower, which begins November 5. The meteor shower has the potential to produce fireballs in the sky.

There are no shortages of quality astronomical events in the very near future.

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