This year’s Strawberry Moon, which marks the short harvesting season for strawberries, offers an exciting event for celestial sightseers. But this year, Saturn’s opposition will be visible at the same time as an already gorgeous June full moon.

Stargazers on the East Coast can look up at 12:53 a.m. Eastern to catch the best glimpse of the moon and Saturn, which will be at its closest and brightest position of the summer. But if you aren’t in the Eastern time zone, have no fear. Inverse has rounded up peak viewing times for the Strawberry Moon and Saturn.

  • CDT (Central Daylight Time): 11:53 p.m. (June 27)
  • CST (Central Standard Time): 10:53 p.m. (June 27)
  • EDT (Eastern Daylight Time): 12:53 a.m. (June 28)
  • HDT (Hawaii-Aleutian Daylight Time): 7:53 p.m. (June 27)
  • HST (Hawaii Standard Time): 6:53 p.m. (June 27)

Even though the moon isn’t a bright strawberry red, it will be the most colorful it gets all year. The moon’s arc is shallow, meaning Earth’s atmosphere filters out all the colors on its spectrum except red and green. That means the moon will look more reddish as it rises and sets, but in the middle of the night will take on a more yellow, honey-colored hue.

A strawberry moon over Los Angeles.
A strawberry moon over Los Angeles.

“It’s the most colorful of all full moons,” Daniel M. Soref, Milwaukee Public Museum’s Theater & Planetarium director, told the Milwaukee Journal Sentinel in an interview published Monday. “We always get more color in the sky when things are lower.”

One thing to note is that the moon will also appear as a minimoon, which is difficult to notice with the naked eye but means the moon is at the furthest possible position from Earth. The minimoon will happen next month at the same time, as well, if you can’t get enough of that ever-so-slightly tinier moon.

The Strawberry Moon has different nicknames in different cultures, including the Rose Moon, the Green Corn Moon, the Planting Moon, and the Birth Moon. So wherever you happen to be, don’t miss it!