Doctor Who Season 10 premiered on Saturday, and it looks like Peter Capaldi’s final season as the Doctor is off to a promising start. It begins with the Doctor as a lecturer on physics and poetry — because of course — who takes a food service employee under his tutelage. Reactions from Twitter fandom are nearly unanimous: “The Pilot” is a serious banger of an episode, coming out of the gate much stronger than most Doctor Who season premieres.

Season 10’s uniqueness also extends to the Doctor’s new companion, Bill Potts (Pearlie Mack), who is the show’s first queer black companion. And while some critics say Bill is a lesbian character made for straight men, fans across the gender spectrum seem excited about the compassionate, well-rounded portrayal of a queer main character. Plus, Bill’s sexuality will be an interesting change of pace for a show whose fans tend to “ship” the Doctor and his companion.

And while the new season marks that momentous “first,” it also brings a notable “last”: Showrunner Steven Moffat will take his last bow at the end of Season 10. Moffat will hand the reins over to Broadchurch creator (and longtime Doctor Who fan) Chris Chibnall, whose first season as showrunner will air in 2018.

Here’s what fans are saying about the premiere:


“The Pilot” Is a Solid Start to Season 10

It’s a Rare “Belter” of a First Episode

There’s Great Chemistry Between Bill and the Doctor

The Doctor Already Cares Deeply About Bill

Fans Already Love Bill, Too

Pearl Is a Gem

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Fans Are Excited to See What Comes Next for Bill

Fans Are Thrilled to See a Sensitive Portrayal of an LGBTQ Character

Fans Are “All In”

We Get it! Pearl Mackie Is Amazing!

Bill Potts Feels Well-Developed From the Get-Go

Call Me Mackie?

Pearl Mackie May Be Outshining Her Fellow Companion

Pearl Mackie Is Feeling the Love


Doctor Who airs Saturdays on BBC and BBC America.

Photos via Getty Images / Tim P. Whitby

Peter is a writer living in New York. He is preoccupied with Star Wars and memes, but he writes about climate change, chatbots and ants. You may have seen his work in Popular Science, New Scientist and Motherboard.