SpaceX shared a new video of its breakthrough SES-10 launch on Wednesday, documenting how the company’s Falcon 9 rocket managed to land on the deck of the Of Course I Still Love You droneship for the second time.

Last Thursday’s event marked the first time the company managed to successfully re-use a Falcon 9 rocket, and the first time anyone had ever re-used an orbital class rocket. It was also the first time a rocket was used to put a satellite into geostationary orbit and return to Earth.

The rocket was used to send an SES-10 satellite into orbit, which will provide telecommunications services to Central and South America. Luxembourg-based communications firm SES contracted SpaceX to place the 9,479-pound satellite into orbit.

The rocket’s first mission was in April 2016, when it sent cargo to the International Space Station as part of the CRS-8 mission. The Dragon capsule transported 7,000 pounds of scientific materials and precious supplies, including an expandable living module.

The rocket coming in for landing.
The rocket coming in for landing.

Reusing rockets is important to SpaceX as it allows the company to reduce costs. Each Falcon 9 costs $62 million, but refueling only costs around $200,000. Being able to reduce these costs will help the company achieve its ultimate goal of a mission to Mars.

The rocket landing back on the droneship.
The rocket landing back on the droneship.

“This mission is the fundamental key demonstration that our technology is capable of re—flight,” said Gwynne Shotwell, SpaceX president, in a statement prior to the launch.

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The final touchdown.
The final touchdown.

Where next for Musk? “Next goal is reflight within 24 hours,” he said on Twitter moments after the launch.

Watch the landing below:

Photos via SpaceX, SpaceX/Instagram