The Perseid meteor shower is an annual phenomenon, but this year the hype was off the (star) charts. Astronomers anticipated that the shower of space rocks would be twice as active this year as it was in previous years, but during its peak last night the shower totally disappointed. Just kidding, it was awesome, and we have pictures.

The falling debris we see, also called the Perseid Cloud, comes from the Swift-Tuttle comet. This year, Jupiter’s gravitational field pushed the cloud closer to Earth, supposedly creating a bigger and badder show. The space junk sped into the planet’s orbit at 132,000 miles per hour. We probably won’t see its equal for about a decade.

But don’t worry — if you, like this author, were also trapped in some light-polluted urban morass and unable to watch the 200 luminous meteors per hour that filled the sky last night before burning up in our atmosphere, you, uh, well, you missed it. But it’s okay, because we have pictures:

Wednesday and Thursday were the best times to view the shower, though you can still try your luck Friday night. The best visibility is generally in the West, so you might want to get yourself out of the city tonight in a last-ditch effort to see all the pretty, like this:

And this:

Whatever, it’s just a bunch of rocks in the sky, I’m not sad I missed it. Looks like it was a total snooze fest tbh.

Fine, that’s kinda cool.

All right, now people are just rubbing it in.

Two in one shot? That’s … okay, that’s amazing.

Stupid stupid stupid.

Photos via NASA