Tesla responded to accusations that a Model X autonomously crashed into a building this weekend. The results after the company checked the logs: The crash was due to driver error, not Autopilot.

A Tesla spokesperson explained to Electrek what the company found:

“We analyzed the vehicle logs which confirm that this Model X was operating correctly under manual control and was never in Autopilot or cruise control at the time of the incident or in the minutes before. Data shows that the vehicle was traveling at 6 mph when the accelerator pedal was abruptly increased to 100%. Consistent with the driver’s actions, the vehicle applied torque and accelerated as instructed. Safety is the top priority at Tesla and we engineer and build our cars with this foremost in mind. We are pleased that the driver is ok and ask our customers to exercise safe behavior when using our vehicles.”

The investigation started after a California man claimed that his five-day old Model X autonomously crashed into a building over the weekend. He posted photos of the crash with the username Puzant Ozbag on the official Tesla forum and called for Tesla to “stop deliveries and investigate the cause” of the accident.

Close up of the crash that was at first blamed on Autopilot.
Scene of the crash.

Other commenters in the forum found Ozbag’s claim skeptical because Teslas only self park in reverse and Autopilot doesn’t work at low speeds. Ozbag also claimed in the post that his Model X drove over 39 feet of planters.

Tesla’s data supports the skeptics, and data don’t lie. This is the same situation that happened after a user claimed Tesla’s Summon feature drove his Model S into a trailer. Tesla’s logs showed that the car wasn’t at fault (although the company updated Summon to keep similar crashes from happening).

Claims of Teslas acting up have been popping up more frequently now, but with data on Tesla’s side, the truth about crashes can’t hide.