This week in science

New Hubble Space Telescope capture and more: Understand the world through 7 images

NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center

Heritage Images/Hulton Archive/Getty Images

NASA and ESA released a gorgeous new Hubble Space Telescope image the week of August 3–10, as researchers studied cancer progression and retreating glaciers.

Here are the biggest science stories of the week, told in 7 striking images.

7. The whole tooth

Radiological Society of North America

August 9

Researchers completed a CT scan of an entire woolly mammoth tusk for the first time. Larger CT scanners have allowed scans that weren’t possible before. The scan revealed the seven-foot-long tusk belonged to an approximately 32-year-old mammoth that lived 17,000 years ago.

Radiological Society of North America

6. Deep-sea discovery

Dr Ming-Chih Huang, Journal of Natural History

August 9

Researchers discovered a new species of deep-sea isopod, Bathonymus yucatanensis, in the Gulf of Mexico. Relatives of pillbugs, the crustaceans can grow up to 10 inches long.

Dr Ming-Chih Huang, Journal of Natural History

5. Follow the leader

Norasmah Basari and Nigel R Franks

August 9

Researchers used a tiny robot to determine how ants teach each other the way to a new nest. Using the robot to guide an ant, the scientists found the path taken to the new nest doesn’t influence how well ants learn the route.

Norasmah Basari and Nigel R Franks

4. Understanding cancer’s spread

Matrix and Metastasis Lab, Garvan Institute of Medical Research

August 9

Researchers determined collagen type XII drives breast cancer tumors to metastasize. High levels of collagen XII may be used to predict more aggressive tumors, and scientists are investigating the finding’s therapeutic potential.

Matrix and Metastasis Lab, Garvan Institute of Medical Research

3. Space oddity

ESA/Hubble & NASA, J. Bally, M. H. Özsaraç

August 8

NASA and ESA’s Hubble Space Telescope captured a stunning image of Herbig-Haro object HH 505, a brightly glowing region around a newborn star. Located 1,000 light-years from Earth, the sight is created by collisions of gas and dust.

ESA/Hubble & NASA, J. Bally, M. H. Özsaraç

2. Ice in retreat

Taryn Black/University of Washington

August 5

Researchers found 13 of the 19 glaciers in Alaska’s Kenai Fjords National Park are retreating, with those that end in lakes retreating the most. Their measurements will provide a baseline for future climate change studies and may aid land management.

Taryn Black/University of Washington

1. Under the skin

W. Whyte, et al. Nature Communications

August 3

Researchers created a medical implant that resists being surrounded by scar tissue. By repeatedly inflating and deflating, the device prevents immune cells from building up around it, meaning it can last much longer in the body.

W. Whyte, et al. Nature Communications