This week in science

NASA rolls out Artemis rocket and more: Understand the world through 7 images

NASA

NASA

NASA moved its Artemis I rocket to the launchpad for final tests the week of March 16–23, while researchers found more dire consequences of climate change and peered into a cosmic mystery.

Here are the biggest science stories of the week, told in 7 incredible images.

NASA/JPL-Caltech/SwRI/MSSS

7. Weightless walk

NASA

March 23

Astronauts Raja Chari (NASA) and Matthias Maurer (ESA) performed a spacewalk outside the ISS to install new thermal and electronic components. NASA streamed the procedure live on YouTube.

picture alliance/picture alliance/Getty Images

6. Falling fast

University of Reading

March 23

The first national study of rainfall and temperature’s effect on forests showed India has lost more trees to climate change than previously thought. Researchers warn that India, one of the most forest-covered countries in the world, could suffer rapid biodiversity loss in the coming years.

University of Reading

5. Sweet discovery

Team Väth

March 22

Researchers uncovered new details about how sugar contributes to autoimmune diseases such as Crohn’s disease and type 1 diabetes. Their research could lead to new autoimmune disease treatments that don’t harm healthy immune system function.

Team Väth

4. Breathe easy

University of Leeds

March 21

Engineers created a “tentacle robot” capable of reaching the narrowest bronchial tubes in the lungs for medical treatment. The creepy-sounding proof-of-concept robot is guided by magnets and could be a more maneuverable alternative to existing bronchoscopes.

University of Leeds

March 21

Astronomers captured the clearest image yet of odd radio circles in space. The latest images could help scientist understand what causes these mysterious rings of radio emissions, first spotted in 2020.

© J. English (U. Manitoba)/EMU/MeerKAT/DES(CTIO)

2. Taking the stage

NASA

March 18

NASA rolled its Orion spacecraft to Launch Pad 39B atop the SLS rocket in preparation for its final wet dress rehearsal. The craft is intended for NASA’s uncrewed Artemis I mission, which will pave the way to land astronauts on the Moon by 2025.

NASA

1. Jovian photobomb

NASA/JPL-Caltech/SwRI/MSSS

March 16

NASA released a dramatic image of Jupiter captured by the Juno spacecraft. Jupiter’s moons Io and Europa are faintly visible to the right of the planet in the image.

NASA/JPL-Caltech/SwRI/MSSS