Heat wave

4 ways to beat the heat, according to science

It’s a steamer out there!

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April showers bring May flowers. May flowers bring ... June heatwaves?

That’s how it seems this year, with record-breaking temperatures driven by climate change already hitting several areas of the world during just the first few weeks of summer.

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Extreme temperatures can spell heat exhaustion, heatstroke, and in some cases, death.

Here are 4 ways to keep yourself cool, according to science:

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4. Pour some water on it

Cold showers, damp towels, and ice baths can do the trick.

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Putting water on your skin can help lower your body’s core temperature.

This is especially important to keep your organs from overheating.

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It also helps explain why the pool feels so good on a hot day.

3. Sweat it out!

You can’t beat the body’s natural cooling system.

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Sweating is a very effective method for cooling the body down.

But when the hot weather is also humid, it’s harder for water to evaporate from your skin, causing you to feel sweaty and sticky.

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A dehumidifier can help bring down humidity levels indoors. The temperature might not change, but you’ll probably still feel cooler.

2. Hyrdrate, Hydrate, Hydrate

How are you gonna sweat if you’re not full of water?

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Seriously, though. Staying hydrated is incredibly important to ensure that your body can handle the heat.

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If you’re parched, your body struggles to regulate its internal temperature, which can send you into heat exhaustion or heat stroke.

1. Lay low

If you have the option, it’s best to chill out on a hot day.

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Strenuous activity, including workouts, can be deadly in hot weather.

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Relaxing outside in the shade or indoors is the best way to pass a hot day.

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And if you have to be outside, pace yourself. Listen to your body, and make sure you stay hydrated and take breaks when possible.

Here’s to staying cool — or at least, less hot — all summer long.

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What’s the hottest temperature the human body can withstand? Click here to find out.