Spreading ahead

9 numbers that explain the future of Coronavirus

As the world grapples with the coronavirus outbreak, officials across the globe are making all sorts of predictions: but it's not that easy.

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“All predictions are important. Most predictions are wrong. And I think we must be careful with that.”

Michael Ryan, Executive Director of the WHO Health Emergencies Programme

Out of all the confusion over COVID-19, the data we have so far point to 9 potential futures to help you think about the coming months and years.

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81

The countries that don't yet have coronavirus

(March 12, 2020)

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116,250

The total number of people predicted to be infected with COVID-19.

(As of March 13, 2020)

150,000+

According to those same predictions, by the end of March, cases will be above 150,000.

The numbers vary. The W.H.O. predicts billions more .

Other predictions range from 550,000 to 4.4 million people who could be infected in the next year.

STAT, 2/14/20

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30 to 79
30 to 79

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1.1 million

The number of public school students who go to school in New York City

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2.3 trillion
2.3 trillion
30

Percentage drop in nitrogen dioxide in the air over China.

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$113 billion

Predicted loss in revenue for airline companies.

According to the International Air Travel Association, air travel will drop for the first time since 2009.

A loss between $63 and $113 billion to the industry is predicted.

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1.5 million

Barrels per day that oil exporting countries will cut.

During the COVID-19 outbreak, the oil industry has seen demand plunge by 24 percent.

According to OPEC, oil demand will likely drop by almost 50 percent. That may limit global production by at least 1.5 million barrels per day until the end of June.

12

Percentage increase in stock value for home-fitness brand Peloton.

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There may be more on the horizon.

Inverse will endeavor to keep you updated at our Coronavirus hub, which you can find via our homepage.

Please note: These numbers are accurate as of March 13, 2020. We will update them as needed.

“I think this virus is probably with us beyond this season, beyond this year,” said Robert Redfield, the director of the CDC, to the CNN.

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