Science

Dedicated dads of the animal kingdom

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BIRDS

Male kingfishers help build burrows and incubate eggs.

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After female Emperor penguins lay her single egg, her male partner takes over incubation while she ventures out to sea to spend the winter foraging for food.

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European house wrens build nests to attract females. These wannabe Dads can build up to 12 nests at a time.

INVERTEBRATES

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Male sea spiders risk life and limb to carry egg sacs and must continually wave water over them to provide the eggs oxygen.

The male millipede Brachycybe lecontii exclusively cares for its eggs.

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Male Harvestman, more commonly known as the Daddy Long Legs (an arachnid, but not a spider!) gain evolutionary advantage by protecting their offspring.

MAMMALS

Male Golden Lion Tamarins do most of the child rearing.

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Although male rodents are not known for being stellar fathers, the California deer mouse is extensively involved in raising young.

While female red foxes stay with the cubs, the males go out and hunt for food.

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fish

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Just like in Finding Nemo, anemonefish (more commonly known as clownfish) take expert care of their eggs.

In seahorse families, it’s the male who carries the eggs.

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Male stickleback fish also aggressively guard their nest and wave water over them to replenish oxygen.

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