Work hard, play hard

5 Animals with Life-Saving Jobs

More than just a cute face!

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Meet Magawa. This giant rat has helped locate 71 unexploded land mines in Cambodia.

APOPO

APOPO

After 5 years working for APOPO, a nonprofit based in Belgium, he retired in early June.

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But Magawa is far from the only animal to do this kind of work.

For starters, APOPO works with a whole team of dogs and rats to sniff out buried explosives and tuberculosis in sick patients.

APOPO

Here are 4 other animals with life-saving jobs:

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4. Clams

They know when there’s something in the water.

Caitlin Craggs via Giphy

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In Warsaw, Poland, clams monitor the city’s water supply for contaminants.

Whenever the highly sensitive clams detect large amounts of heavy metals flowing in from the Zegrze reservoir or Vistula river, they clam up.

Fat Kathy/Julia Pelka

Sensors attached to their shells stop the water from flowing.

Fat Kathy/Julia Pelka

Gruba Kaska/Julia Pelka

The clams were featured in a 2019 documentary, Gruba Kaska, or Fat Kathy, the name of the water pump station where they reside.

3. Birds

More than just feathers and eye-catching colors.

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Since they’re small and have high metabolisms, the canaries would succumb to toxic breathing conditions well before the miners.

This left the workers time to evacuate the mine to safety.

Fernando Trabanco Fotografía/Moment/Getty Images

Of course, the practice also led to a lot of dead canaries.

Coal-mine canaries were phased out in the late 1980s in favor of electronic carbon monoxide detectors.

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2. Dolphins

All brains here.

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The U.S. military deploys these savvy mammals to the depths of the ocean to sniff out underwater bombs.

1. Dogs

Man’s best friend, and biggest helper.

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They’ve been trained to sniff out weapons, explosives, drugs, and even illness.

State of Social via Giphy

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Research suggests they might even be able to detect when people are infected with COVID-19.

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Read more stories about animals here.

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