LOL

3 animals that evolved to laugh

Laughter helps us create bonds, strengthens our mental well-being, and can even help strengthen our bodies physically.

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After all, people are 30 percent more likely to laugh when with a group than alone.

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These days, some therapists even prescribe “homeplay” rather than “homework,” to encourage people to experience the mental benefits of laughter.

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The evolutionary origins of laughter aren’t well understood, but scientists theorize laughter evolved as a way to strengthen bonds between groups and individuals.

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The origin of laughter appears to have occurred sometime between 10 and 16 million years ago.

But humans aren’t the only animals that laugh.

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Some animals, like kookaburra and hyenas, may vocalize in a way that to our ears sounds like laughter, but for these animals the sounds don’t function as laughter.

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When rats engage in play behavior or are tickled by a human, they emit a sound which can only be picked up by special microphones.

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Baby chimpanzees, gorillas, and orangutans also make distinct, laughter-like vocalizations when tickled by humans.

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The infamously mischievous kea parrot of New Zealand doesn’t exactly laugh, but it does produce a special “play call” which triggers play behavior in other keas — like infectious laughter.

Read more animal stories here.

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