Sarah Wells

Sarah Wells is a Boston-based Innovation reporter at Inverse covering all things technological from emotional robots to the strange world of machine learning and quantum computing. She also writes Inverse's "Check, please" food column which explores some of food science's most pervasive myths and uses chemistry, biology, and physics to debunk them. In addition to her work at Inverse, Sarah is also a freelance journalist and has had her work published in places like Undark, Popular Mechanics, Gizmodo, Motherboard, PBS Space Time, and Smithsonian.com, among others. Sarah earned her M.S. in science journalism from Boston University in 2018 and was awarded SciShortForm's "Top Pick" blog and honorable mention in 2019. She is also a member of the National Association of Science Writers. When not poring through scientific papers or calling up researchers, she enjoys playing tennis and biking with her husband as well as unwinding with baking and podcasts. (Photo credit: Marshall Chen)
order up
What did Italians eat 2,000 years ago? New discoveries reveal a diverse menu
Sarah Wells
We are what we eat, in more ways than one.
took a dna test
3D skull analysis debunks what we know about Anglo-Saxons
Sarah Wells
For historic Britons, ancestry may be more learned than genetic.
Check, please
The scary real science behind Snow White’s poison apple
Sarah Wells
A strange fact is like something out of a fairy tale.
chill out
Scientists at LIGO are one step closer to solving general relativity’s biggest problem
Sarah Wells
Scientists are one step closer to solving general relativity’s biggest problem.
Goooooooooal
The future of sports is algorithms, not athletes
Sarah Wells
From fantasy leagues to biometrics, sports is becoming its own cyborg.
Check, please!
Science debunks a racist myth about Chinese food
Sarah Wells
“The start of the MSG myth was... a tacitly racist game of telephone.”
just keep swimming
Freeze-dried sperm: The future of space colonies is being tested on the ISS
Sarah Wells
Life on Mars may be freeze-dried.
lift off
Flying cars are "imminent" new study finds
Sarah Wells
Science fiction has been promising us flying cars for decades, but now a new super-heated battery design could finally make this a reality for eVTOL.
Check, please!
Which milk is best for Earth? Science explains why your fave is problematic
Sarah Wells
Dairy milk is an environmental disaster, but which plant-based milk should take its place? Scientists help answer that question and say diversity is key.
open wide
The scary science behind Mexico’s massive sinkhole
Sarah Wells
The answer lies deep beneath the Earth.
counting electric sheep
Mind-bending neuroscience theory answers an age-old question about dreams
Sarah Wells
Neuroscientist Erik Hoel has a new theory about dreaming that predicts our dreams may have more in common with artificial intelligence than you might think.
Check, please!
Doctor debunks the stomach-churning myth about an “indestructible” food
Sarah Wells
Can gum really stay in your stomach for 7 years?
recipe book
Brood X bon appétit! How to eat cicadas in 5 easy steps
Sarah Wells
Dine on summer's biggest insect delicacy!
at your service
1 crucial human trait robots can’t replace in the workforce
Sarah Wells
Trust is a fickle thing to earn, and robots aren’t quite there yet.
Check, please!
5-second rule: Science debunks food myth backed by Gengis Khan
Sarah Wells
Just how scientific is this superstition?
uncanny valley
Robotic augmentation can transform human bodies — but at a cost
Sarah Wells
If you become an android, your mind may fundamentally change.
Science
Geologists discover physics-defying “forbidden” crystal at atomic bomb site
Sarah Wells
The bomb that kicked off the Atomic Age also brought extreme physics to Earth for the first time in billions of years.
getting personal
The emotional reason why you should let robots touch you
Sarah Wells
It could improve your mood.
Check, please!
Is food coloring made of bugs? Chemists debunk a common fear
Sarah Wells
Red colored foods, cosmetics, and even clothes have one thing in common: a tiny bug called cochineal. And it's already a staple of your diet.
pants on fire
Ancient tooth debunks a 2,500-year-old claim about Greek soldiers
Sarah Wells
Don’t trust everything you read in history books.