Few full moons are quite as beautiful as the Flower Moon. Tonight, (Wednesday, May 10) at 5:42 p.m. Eastern time, the moon will rise, shining faintly for the casual observer on their way home from work. Though everybody in the Northern Hemisphere won’t be able to see the moon in full peak, if you are on the East Coast, the best time to observe is around 8 p.m, when the sun sets.

Why It’s Called the “Flower Moon”

The Native Americans have a name for every full moon of the year. Last month’s was the Pink Moon, which symbolized the coming of spring. May’s full moon is known as the Flower Moon because it rises when flowers are beginning to bloom and blossom.

Ojibwe tribes of the Great Lakes named it the Flower Moon or “Waawaaskone Giizis.” The Ontario Native Women’s Association says this is when the plants display their spirit sides and it is a time of spiritual exploration. The moon is also a sign of health and rejuvenation, specifically because the plants have healing medicines that become available when the plants blossom.

Sure enough, this moon is right on time, as even the trees are sprouting foliage right about now. It is also believed to be a time of fertility and a good time to bear children as the months get warmer.

Other tribes, like the Cree Nation in northern Montana and parts of Canada, refer to the May moon as the Frog Moon because it is the time of year frogs begin to wake up and chirp. The Algonquins called the moon the Corn Planting Moon as it is the time of year that corn can begin to be planted. They also call it the Milk Moon because milkweed begins to bloom.

How and When to See the “Full Flower Moon”

During this full moon, the moon will be in the sky for a shorter period of time than the sun because the moon is running below the celestial equator, so it has a shorter path and makes quicker rotations around Earth. In fact, it will only spend about ten hours in the horizon.

Appearance-wise, the Flower Moon will be larger because it is closer to the horizon. And because it isn’t crossing paths with any planets or nearby stars, it will stand out brighter than usual.

SpaceX is gearing up to send humans into space for the first time. On Monday, CEO Elon Musk confirmed a report that claimed NASA estimates the firm will be ready for people-carrying space adventures as early as April of next year. While a good sign for the company’s Mars mission, a successful human test flight would also enable a new method of sending people to the International Space Station.

What’s worse than one natural disaster? Try two natural disasters. Kilauea volcano continues to erupt in Hawaii, and now the islands are in the path of a category 3 hurricane.

Hurricane Hector is on track to hit the Big Island of Hawaii according to CNN. With maximum wind reaching speeds of 125 mph, the hurricane is still a long way from the islands, approximately 1,360 miles out as of Sunday. At this far distance, it can still change directions and avoid the Big Island of Hawaii altogether, but the high speeds of a hurricane combined with the erupting Kilauea volcano is a concern.

Consider, for a moment, the paper cut. It happens suddenly and entirely unexpectedly, usually just as you are finally getting somewhere on that task you had been putting off.

Recall your sense of relief to finish that thank-you note to your aunt for the lovely sweater she sent you three months prior when, at the crucial moment, your hands failed you in their familiar task and the paper’s edge slid past its restraints into the flesh. Then pain – sharp, pure pain that bends your consciousness to the Only. Thing. That. Matters. Right. Now. There is sometimes a moment, between awareness and pain, when you bargain with fate, hoping that what just happened didn’t. But the hand is gone and the blood needs tending.

A new study has finally offered an explanation for Jupiter’s trippy colors and unusual swirls. These gaseous swirls have become the most recognizable aspect of the giant planet but also one of its most puzzling features. A team of scientists says they now understand what causes the planet’s distinctive color bands and why these swirls behave the way they do.

Ever seen a meteoroid hit the moon? Almost definitely not in person, but have you ever seen video of such space phenomena? If you haven’t, thanks to something called the Moon Impacts Detection and Analysis System, now you can.

The system, also known as MIDAS, captured the moments when two rogue meteoroids hit the moon’s surface on July 17 and 18. That’s right; this happened twice over two different days, with the meteoroids striking two different locations on the lunar surface.